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Parish Daily Update 6/26/20

Dear Parish Family,

“Do not look forward in fear to the changes of life;

rather look to them with full hope that as they arise,

God, whose very own you are,

will lead you safely through all things;

and when you cannot stand it,

God will carry you in his arms.

Do not fear what may happen tomorrow;

the same everlasting Father who cares for you

today will take care of you today and every day.

He will either shield you from suffering or will

give you unfailing strength to bear it.

Be at peace and put aside all anxious thoughts

and imaginations.”                                       ~~St. Francis de Sales

If you have Mass reservations for Sunday, be sure to arrive early so you can be checked-in and seated by our ushers!!  The doors are closed after Mass begins so that the ushers can join their families for Mass.

God bless you all!  See you soon,

Pam

Saturday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time

First Reading:  Lam 2:2, 10-14, 18-19

The Lord has consumed without pity all the dwellings of Jacob; He has torn down in his anger
the fortresses of daughter Judah; He has brought to the ground in dishonor her king and her princes. On the ground in silence sit the old men of daughter Zion; They strew dust on their heads and gird themselves with sackcloth; The maidens of Jerusalem bow their heads to the ground. Worn out from weeping are my eyes, within me all is in ferment; My gall is poured out on the ground because of the downfall of the daughter of my people, As child and infant faint away in the open spaces of the town. In vain they ask their mothers, “Where is the grain?”
As they faint away like the wounded in the streets of the city, and breathe their last in their mothers’ arms. To what can I liken or compare you, O daughter Jerusalem? What example can I show you for your comfort, virgin daughter Zion? For great as the sea is your downfall; who can heal you? Your prophets had for you false and specious visions; They did not lay bare your guilt,
to avert your fate; They beheld for you in vision false and misleading portents. Cry out to the Lord; moan, O daughter Zion! Let your tears flow like a torrent day and night; Let there be no respite for you, no repose for your eyes. Rise up, shrill in the night, at the beginning of every watch; Pour out your heart like water in the presence of the Lord; Lift up your hands to him
for the lives of your little ones Who faint from hunger at the corner of every street.

Responsorial Psalm:  Ps 74:1b-2, 3-5, 6-7, 20-21

R. Lord, forget not the souls of your poor ones.
Why, O God, have you cast us off forever?
Why does your anger smolder against the sheep of your pasture?
Remember your flock which you built up of old,
the tribe you redeemed as your inheritance,
Mount Zion, where you took up your abode.
R. Lord, forget not the souls of your poor ones.
Turn your steps toward the utter ruins;
toward all the damage the enemy has done in the sanctuary.
Your foes roar triumphantly in your shrine;
they have set up their tokens of victory.
They are like men coming up with axes to a clump of trees.
R. Lord, forget not the souls of your poor ones.
With chisel and hammer they hack at all the paneling of the sanctuary.
They set your sanctuary on fire;
the place where your name abides they have razed and profaned.
R. Lord, forget not the souls of your poor ones.
Look to your covenant,
for the hiding places in the land and the plains are full of violence.
May the humble not retire in confusion;
may the afflicted and the poor praise your name.
R. Lord, forget not the souls of your poor ones.

Gospel:  Mt 8:5-17

When Jesus entered Capernaum, a centurion approached him and appealed to him, saying,
“Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, suffering dreadfully.” He said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion said in reply, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof; only say the word and my servant will be healed. For I too am a man subject to authority,
with soldiers subject to me. And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes; and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him, “Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith.  I say to you, many will come from the east and the west, and will recline with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob at the banquet in the Kingdom of heaven, but the children of the Kingdom will be driven out into the outer darkness, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.”  And Jesus said to the centurion, “You may go; as you have believed, let it be done for you.”  And at that very hour his servant was healed. Jesus entered the house of Peter, and saw his mother-in-law lying in bed with a fever. He touched her hand, the fever left her, and she rose and waited on him. When it was evening, they brought him many who were possessed by demons, and he drove out the spirits by a word and cured all the sick, to fulfill what had been said by Isaiah the prophet: He took away our infirmities and bore our diseases.

Homily

“Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof; only say the word and my servant will be healed.” Matthew 8:5-17

In an interview with Bill Moyers, best-selling novelist Barbara Kingsolver discussed the vocation of writing:

“What a writer can do, what a fiction writer or a poet or an essay writer can do, is re-engage people with their own humanity. Fiction and essays can create empathy for the theoretical stranger . . . When you pick up a novel from the bed side table, you put down your own life at the same time and you become another person for the duration. And so, you live that person’s life and you understand in a way that you don’t learn from reading a newspaper what it’s like to live a life that’s completely different from yours.  And when you put that book down, you’re changed. You have something more expansive in your heart than you began with. Empathy is really the opposite of spiritual meanness.  It’s the capacity to understand that every war is both won and lost.  And that someone else’s pain is as meaningful as your own.” [NOW with Bill Movers, PBS, May 24, 2002.]

Empathy: to see the world as bigger than yourself and your wants and needs and expectations; to realize that in every decision made and action taken someone will benefit but someone will pay a price; that the pain endured by another is as serious and as worthy of alleviation as your own. Jesus embodied such empathy – Jesus’ empathy moves Matthew the evangelist to cite the prophet Isaiah: He took away our infirmities and bore our diseases.

Empathy is at the heart of following Jesus. Especially now, we need to practice empathy toward one another: to put aside our own interests and expectations in order to understand the struggles of those whose lives are so different from our own and begin to cross the chasms of divisions and heal what has been broken too long.

O God, Father of us all, instill in us your Son’s spirit of empathy that opens our hearts and attitudes to realize that all human beings are your children, possessing the sacred dignity of being your sons and daughters. May we take up the healing work of your Christ: lifting up and honoring the dignity of every soul in the midst of poverty, injustice and brokenness.

An Act of Spiritual Communion

My Jesus, I believe that You are present

in the Most Holy Sacrament.

I love You above all things,

and I desire to receive You into my soul.

Since I cannot at this moment receive You sacramentally,

I ask You to come spiritually into my heart.

I embrace You, trusting that you are already there and I unite myself wholly to You.

Never permit me to be separated from You.

Amen.

St. Cyril of Alexandria

Alexandria was the largest city of the ancient world.  Rather like Los Angeles, it was a sprawling mixture of races and creeds; and it was byword for the violence of its sectarian politics whether Greeks against Jews or Orthodox Christians against heretics. St. Cyril of Alexandria, was born at Alexandria, Egypt. He was nephew of the patriarch of that city, Theophilus. Cyril received a classical and theological education at Alexandria and was ordained by his uncle. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople in 403 and was present at the Synod of the Oak that deposed John Chrysostom, whom he believed guilty of the charges against him. He succeeded his uncle Theophilus as patriarch of Alexandria on Theophilus’ death in 412, but only after a riot between Cyril’s supporters and the followers of his rival Timotheus. Cyril at once began a series of attacks against the Novatians, whose churches he closed; the Jews, whom he drove from the city; and governor Orestes, with whom he disagreed about some of his actions. In 430 Cyril became embroiled with Nestorius, patriarch of Constantinople, who was preaching that Mary was not the Mother of God since Christ was Divine and not human, and consequently she should not have the word theotokos (God-bearer) applied to her. He persuaded Pope Celestine I to convoke a synod at Rome, which condemned Nestorius, and then did the same at his own synod in Alexandria. Celestine directed Cyril to depose Nestorius, and in 431, Cyril presided over the third General Council at Ephesus, attended by some two hundred bishops, which condemned all the tenets of Nestorius and his followers before the arrival of Archbishop John of Antioch and forty-two followers who believed Nestorius was innocent. When they found what had been done, they held a council of their own and deposed Cyril. Emperor Theodosius II arrested both Cyril and Nestorius but released Cyril on the arrival of Papal Legates who confirmed the council’s actions against Nestorius and declared Cyril innocent of all charges. Two years later, Archbishop John, representing the moderate Antiochene bishops, and Cyril reached an agreement and joined in the condemnation, and Nestorius was forced into exile. During the rest of his life, Cyril wrote treatises that clarified the doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation and that helped prevent Nestorianism and Pelagianism from taking long-term deep root in the Christian community. He was the most brilliant theologian of the Alexandrian tradition. His writings are characterized by accurate thinking, precise exposition, and great reasoning skills. Among his writings are commentaries on John, Luke, and the Pentateuch, treatises on dogmatic theology, and Apologia against Julian the Apostate, and letters and sermons. He was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in 1882. His feast day is June 27th.